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Showing content with the highest reputation since 11/06/2010 in all areas

  1. 4 points
    It would also be nice to have the shell menu option "Add to VIPM Library." on *.vip files and not only on *.vipc files. This way *.vip files can be added to the VIPM library from the windows explorer without having to install them.
  2. 3 points
    Some advanced users are asking for support to install VIPM for Windows onto a Docker container. This would allow creating fully automated build processes that spin up virtual machines that have LabVIEW and VIPM installed on them, so that VI Packages can be created automatically.
  3. 3 points
    I'd love to see these three License-related improvements to VIPM: 1) First, a main window column showing the package license, so it becomes very easy to see whether a package is open source, freeware, proprietary/custom, or something else. It'd be nice if the column title could be clicked to sort sort packages by license type: 2) To complement this, a change to the filter box with options to filter by license type, or maybe a second filtering box for this specific purpose. This would further help those searching for packages to focus on finding one they can afford and actually use for new open source projects, which is particularly relevant now that LabVIEW Community Edition is going to bring in lots of new users who definitely aren't going to purchase proprietary add-ons: 3) Finally, it be interesting for the VIPM Community Edition, specifically, to only allow the creation of open source packages, what would create a clear barrier to those who might be thinking of using VIPM Community Edition for proprietary package creation. This could be done by changing the "License Agreement Name" (in VIMP Community Edition only) from a free form text field to a combo box listing only OSI-Approved licenses' SPDX codes, therefore making the intended purpose extremely clear. The default option could be BSD, with other popular OSI-Approved licenses listed below it, and less common ones (if requested) on a submenu: What do you think? 😊 PS: Re-posted with changes from the original in the VIPM 2020 Beta board.
  4. 3 points
    I have installed LABVIEW 2019, and I followed the procedures to make sure VIPM can communicate with VIPM 2018.0.0f2: https://support.jki.net/hc/en-us/articles/214135683-Resolving-issues-with-VIPM-connecting-to-LabVIEW But, still I do not see LABVIEW 2019 listed within the VIPM window: Any clue on how o solve this? Thanks
  5. 2 points
    I do not know what I am doing wrong: I have an account on https://www.vipm.io/ where I can log in. I have VIPM installed and it was just recently automatically updated. I am able to install i2 JSON for 2018-64 I am not able to log in for "community" or "free" status. When I choose in the new window "Use existing JKI account" I get an error message, when using the account data for www.vipm.io. I also get an error when choosing "Sing up for a new JKI account". When pressing "Forgot your password?" an new tab in the browser opens where I can write my mail address and it tells me that an email was sent. However, I nether get the mail, nor is it gone to my spam folder. What can I do to solve this. I rely in my largest project on the OpenG lib and the MGI lib, which was not a problem to install in previous time. Best regards Wolfgang Kilian
  6. 2 points
    Hi, I am having an issue with functions palette I generate in VIPM. The palette is generated and behaves correctly in LabVIEW, however, when I click "show in palettes" in VIPM after installing toolkit, instead of my functions palette, Agilent 34401 palette is displayed. Any idea what might be wrong?
  7. 2 points
    John, check out "Test Runner Pre-build action.vi" in the 1.0 release. I'm not sure what the current version is on LVTN, but you can find 1.0 on GitHub: https://github.com/JKISoftware/Caraya/tree/release/1.0.0/src The first snippet below is the Pre-Build action itself, the second is the actual guts of where the test gets invoked. Let me know if that doesn't get you started in the right direction or you have more questions.
  8. 2 points
    In any validation setting, the tolerances around measured and reported values is critical, and so is tracking the tolerances for any given parameter being measured, with any measurement device or sensor. To automate the calculation of these ranges and limits within our overall application, we must track the specifications of any of these parameters. This used to be done using a peer reviewed excel table, and was loaded into LabVIEW using the Report Generation Toolkit. This had several drawbacks, but that's not the point of this post. The point is that using Excel means that any text becomes free text and if data isn't entered correctly then it can cause issues with parsing. So I created something I call the Specification Manager. It's a small utility that is intended to only be used by validation test case developers to add new specifications to the database of available specifications that can be tested, or to add new hardware for use in the validation tool. I built this tool in about 2-3 days as a way of trying out the JKI Flat UI 2.0 and the Design Palette. Here's the home screen of the tool: Some things that I think make this a nice UI: Dark background (76, 76, 76) and a nice pop of vibrant color, the icon for the tool uses the same two colors to provide consistency All native windows elements are hidden as this tool is very small and simple, there's no need for a toolbar, etc. Our company uses Century Gothic as a common font in many places, so I used that for some of my UI elements (title bar, specifically) System Chiselled Line separating workflow components of the tool. That horizontal line doesn't look like much, but it's a visual separation of the two things you're supposed to do with this tool. 1) select a file path, 2) manipulate the individual .spec files Listbox to store data - I hate working with listboxes, but I think they are the best UI element for storing continuous data. They look way better than any array I've seen when the data is simple. To add a new specification to the library, you press 'add' and get a dialog window that's a sort of wizard: I used the JKI built-in buttons here to give some sort of icon to the various specifications that can be created. I also changed the color scheme of this wizard to 'light' to signal to the user that this is a dialog/configuration type window and not really part of the core functionality of the utility. If this were a project for a wider audience, I would have customized them a bit more, but as-is, I think it's okay. The symbols are kind of meaningless as the library isn't as vast as I'd like it to be. After selecting the type of specification, you enter the name of it: This screen continues to use consistent fonts, and buttons from the previous screen. Pressing 'Continue' gets you to the heart of what this application is intended to do, modify specifications. (*I typed in random data, please don't double check these against the actual specifications of the 6218 - I will not be using this data in production) I used an array of customized clusters containing the JKI Flat UI 2.0 numerics and enums, then used some more of their pre-built buttons at the bottom for continued navigation. I used the same pop of color on the cancel button, mostly for fun, but also as a way of drawing immediate contrast between the other two operations that the buttons provide. That's about it! This is an internal-only tool, but I think that editing specifications using this small purpose-built utility will be easier than us using Excel to do the same thing. Overall impressions of the Flat UI 2.0 library: Pros: good selection of commonly used buttons and controls, consistent theme across numerics, strings, enums, file paths, and buttons - makes a consistent UI easy to build Color customization of buttons is easy, including customization of the hover-state (which I did to the 'X' button on the home screen of the utility) Wishlist: As with any library of icons and UI elements - a wider selection. I had a hard time finding icons for my 'Add Specification' wizard screen and had to reach pretty far Design palette only launches when using the left ctrl+shift buttons, it'd be nice for it to work with either left or right Cons: Working with the String controls and indicators was a little strange. There are actually two resizable elements in a single control, one for the frame/background and one for the actual text field. I had to be careful when resizing the control to make sure that both fields were resized correctly. Also the front panel snapping meant that the border around the text area was easy to lose if the text field itself was resized incorrectly. I will probably continue to use the UI library for the internal only developer tools, but for the main applications that I'm working on there is still heavy customization specific to my company that I will continue to have to do. Thanks for reading - feel free to ask any questions about the design choices or other elements of the UI for this tool.
  9. 2 points
    Got same error from time to time. Have to restart LabVIEW. LabVIEW 2019 32bit Windows 7 Pro.
  10. 2 points
    This may be due to the Wayland X server. If you are using Wayland, try switching to the Xorg X server and see if the command works.
  11. 2 points
    For the fact that one could use a 3rd party additional software for $ 499 only one year meaningfully is pure rip-off. JKI, never again !!
  12. 2 points
    In version 1.0.3 we've added System Arrays to the "System" theme of the JKI Design Palette. There are two different System Arrays arrays. 1) There's one with a "System Spin Control" for the Index Display (with increment and decrement buttons), which is nice because it's similar to the other array controls (Classic, etc.) 2) There's another one with a "System Numeric" for the Index Display (without increment and decrement buttons), which is nice because sometimes you don't want/need the increment and decrement buttons. These are really useful for creating nice System themed UIs with controls like the ones shown below. Have fun!
  13. 2 points
    Nice. The empty clusters and arrays now work without issues! Here is a suggestion for the existing clusters/arrays that contain a delete me button (in case you need to keep it after the latest upgrade): why not make the text hidden and the color transparent so it won't even appear (since it is going to be deleted anyway) And for the decorations, I suggest that you put the decoration on top of an transparent empty cluster that will get deleted after being placed on the FP (in a similar approach to the above).
  14. 2 points
    Yeah I was able to replicate the issues that you described. Creating and empty array/cluster caused all the controls to disappear on the palette. That is why the existing clusters in the palette contains a dummy "Delete Me" control :). You can do the same with a decoration to add it to the palette: AA
  15. 2 points
    Show Labels of All Controls in the JKI SDP (Ctrl+L) You can show or hide the labels of all the controls in the JKI SDP by pressing Ctrl+L. Press Ctrl+L to show labels on all the controls: Press Ctrl+L again to hide the labels
  16. 2 points
    Ideas and Features: Add other commonly used controls that aren't supported Clusters, arrays, subpanels, decorations, etc. Add more advanced controls Animated Menu Toggled controls (such as one button that does start + stop function) Custom Radio Selectors (paging/tabbing) Draggable Navbar UI templates Merge VIs Other commonly used modern UI building blocks Let us know if you have any others! Post an Idea or Feature Request Now.
  17. 2 points
    Hello Jim, It used to be that older versions of VIPM could connect to the newest versions of LABVIEW. Is there any particular reason why this changed? This issue seems to have happened from the VIPM 2018 Version because it was a major update. Is this going to happen for all versions of VIPMs in the future? The problem is that I have a licence for VIPM 2018, and now I can't use VIPM 2018 with LABVIEW 2019 (I won't be able to generate VIPC files without the licence). thanks Helcio
  18. 2 points
    Get the JKI State Machine Editor (just check VIPM for package updates) Version 2013.4.0.186 This new release adds a right-click option called "Find Data Accessors" to Bundle by Name and Unbundle by Name nodes in a JKI State Machine. Using this feature will open a dialog showing all the frames of the JKI State Machine that access the data, as shown below:
  19. 2 points
    I found one problem that occurs to me. "Find Data Accessors" is available in any VI (not only JKI State Machine) for the Unbudle by Name function, but its call does not cause the appropriate list to be displayed in the dialog box, although the application is started and consumes processor resources. Calling it several times on a notebook with an i5-4210M processor results in 100% CPU load. I've attached a screenshot for the FMSM example from LabVIEW example projects. As you can see, also Add Dynamic Events and JKI State Machine Editor... are visible - only when pop-up on Bundle/Unbundle by Name.
  20. 1 point
    It seems that the difference is that the error shows when the package is double-clicked on a network drive and it opens normally when double-clicked on a local drive.
  21. 1 point
    Thanks Jim. That was exactly what I was looking for.
  22. 1 point
    It works... Thanks a lot. Best regards Markus
  23. 1 point
    A recent conversation on LAVA: https://lavag.org/topic/21631-anybody-having-problems-with-vipm-2020-and-how-can-i-get-vipm-2019/?tab=comments#comment-132642 Suggest multiple LabVIEW developers are unhappy with the 2020 version of VIPM. I think you have been a bit aggressive in the number of changes, and you need to quickly get on top of some of the issues. You need a 2020.1 version soon.
  24. 1 point
    I have the same problem now, irritating as hell. Having paying customers is of course the optimal for JKI, but it still seems silly to chase everyone over to alternative solutions. It is the adoption rate after all that makes the platform interesting for package publishers. And now that we are all forced to register to download even the open source projects proper logon functionality has become critical. Please support every user, and fix the connection issues.
  25. 1 point
    Hi Sam. VIPM 2020 works a little bit differently. It hangs around in memory for a little bit in case someone uses it again -- this way, it's much more responsive. Yet, it's changed the observed behavior around exactly when the package list refreshes. This is something we're working on and should be improved in the next release.
  26. 1 point
    By the may thanks for an awesome toolkit and the quick response!
  27. 1 point
    There’s a new build of the JKI design palette that supports LabVIEW 2020! https://www.vipm.io/package/jki_design_palette/
  28. 1 point
    Is this going to be in the next VIPM version?
  29. 1 point
    Thanks, I'll do that. Option 2 would be nice, but I've wished a few times that the Add Control or VI option allowed multiple selections as well. That seems like the more versatile option if only implementing one of the two is feasible. Side question: Any idea why Chrome freezes will VIPM is processing a (very) large package? Background: This package I'm working on is actually a message dictionary for one of my company's products that has 27 different communication nodes and over 1200 defined messages. Since LabVIEW does not support sparse enums, the best strategy I've found to convert this into a LabVIEW library so far is using VI scripting to convert all the #DEFINES into individual VIs that are simply numeric constants wired to an indicator. Essentially, these are "constant" VIs. The end result is the library ends up having ~1450 files in it by the time all is said and done. LabVIEW has generally handled this library fine as a local library I've copied into my projects, but I wanted to package it to make it more easily distributed and easier to keep up to date when our R&D engineers release new product software. Understandably, it takes a while for VIPM to process all these files and build a package, and after installing it takes a while to update the package list. I suppose all of that is to be expected, but what's interesting is that Chrome freezes while a few of these steps are occurring. Every other application on my computer is responsive.
  30. 1 point
    Hi, in our company we changed the Parse State Queue VI, so that we get the previous state in case we had an error. With this it was so much easier to debug the JKI-SM, because we were able to display the state, where the error occurred. Maybe this this an idea for the original Parse State Queue?? Here is an snippet based on the "old" Parse State Queue VI.
  31. 1 point
    I was able to fix this by setting vip files to open with VIPM File Handler.exe by default.
  32. 1 point
    One of my colleages found a sulution: I had to check the security checkbox under the general properties of the VIPM installer file. After that, the installation was successfull.
  33. 1 point
    Hi guys, @Christoph, you can press Ctrl+R to re-initialize the Palette. That will exit the interactive and color modes. I just noticed another bug using these easter eggs (see video attached). Here is what I did: I first changed the colors of the controls (works well, very cool feature 😊) and then I "allowed interaction" to have a better idea of how these controls would behave on the front panel. After doing that, I selected the JKI Flat UI 2.0 theme inside the Palette and noticed the controls did change color, but I couldn't click on them. I then tried the same thing with my own controls (that I previously added to the Palette) and same problem, I couldn't click on them. In this case, they also wouldn't change color when I moved my mouse pointer over them. Best, Benoit JKI Design Palette.mp4
  34. 1 point
    I think I might be able to share this specific utility I'm working on. It's a very small piece in the big picture of what I'm working on, and I use little utilities like this to try out new toolkits, modules, or LabVIEW components to see what might be worth bringing into our more mainstream code. In this case, the utility I'm working on is an accuracy specification management tool. I can probably post a few screenshots and thoughts on the UI development once I finish it up.
  35. 1 point
    A mouse over hover effect has become standard in most major software UIs. This effect allows users to interact with controls in a more intuitive way and gives users confidence that they are making the selection that they intend. However there is a long standing NI bug that renders the hover effect inconsistent (see the discussion here: https://forums.ni.com/t5/LabVIEW/Button-Boolean-mouse-hover-not-working-on-64-Bit-LabVIEW/m-p/3944252#M1121887) Until NI makes a fix one 'solution' that I will employ is to disable the hover effect with the controls that I am using so that users do not get confused by a control stuck in a hover state.
  36. 1 point
    The design palette shows up every time I open a LabVIEW project, is it the intended behavior? And is it possible to change this? Cheers
  37. 1 point
    @Jim C you may want to tell your coworkers to sit down when the hear about this new release... We've made another great round of improvements to the JKI State Machine Editor that we're excited to tell you about. Integrated Event Structure and Case Structure Viewer The biggest thing you'll notice is that we've integrated the Event Structure and Case Structure into a single tree view -- all of the Event Structure frames have been added under the "Idle" ("Event Structure") item at the top of the tree (as shown in the screenshot below). You can now easily navigate all the Event Structure frames and Case Structure frames from this single tree view. Drag & drop to reorder the Event frames -- it works just as you'd expect! Context Help Shows Documentation for Frames of the JKI SM If you show the Context Help window (<Ctrl+H> or Help >> Show Context Help) and then hover over a frame name in the JKI State Machine Explorer's tree view, the Context Help window will update to show the documentation string for that frame. Explore States Dialog Another cool feature we added is the ability to Explore States on a state string constant. Simply right-click on a state string constant and choose Explore States (as shown below). This will open a dialog (shown below) that looks a lot like your string constant, and allows you to click on individual lines/states of the string constant, which will navigate the JKI State Machine to that frame. This allows you to quickly jump between frames if you'd like to navigate through the sequence of states in the string constant. Grouped Right-click Options on States Finally, we added a small usability improvement where we now group all of the right-click options for a state, under a single submenu (as shown below) -- previously, these were all at the root level and started to get unwieldy. I hope you enjoy this latest round of improvements to the JKI State Machine Editor and it helps your write great code even faster.
  38. 1 point
    Hello, I am having trouble loading tests. When VI tester starts it doesn't find my tests. I can manually load 1 test by File/Open File or test class. I can't load multiple tests. I have my classes in folders. Do the test classes need to be in the top level of my project? I have them in a auto populating folder called "Unit tests? Thanks Dan
  39. 1 point
    Yep, the new version works well. Many thanks!
  40. 1 point
    We figured it out -- it was getting an error during Macro Exit (shutdown), that was causing it to go into the error handler, which was going into Macro Exit (an infinite loop). You can work around this issue by tweaking the code inside the JKI SM Explorer window to look like the following. (You can open the JKI SM Explorer then press Ctrl+Space to stop the VI, then Ctrl+M to go into Edit mode). Update: This has been fixed in version 2018.0.1.36 of the JKI State Machine package, which has been published and is available for download and installation using VIPM.
  41. 1 point
    No, CPU usage is high all of the time. Yes, Mass Compile is enabled (always). I reinstalled JKI State Machine, but still nothing. So, I have to remember to close the Block Diagram first or JKI SM Editor (Explorer in fact...). Maybe it is important or not... my LabVIEW version is 2018 (18.0f2)
  42. 1 point
    @Jim Kring Ahaaaa- in my case, that folder already existed from a previous install; and the jki.conf it contained was owned (755) by the previous user of my machine... I recursively gave myself permissions through the whole folder, which cured the error 8; however, VIPM would then launch, and die silently while still at the splash screen.. So I blow away the whole JKI folder, and everything went fine from a clean start ;-) -Thanks for your help! ~Tom
  43. 1 point
    I really like this template. It works great, is easy to use, easy to debug, keeps things well organized, etc, etc, etc. The one issue that I have with it is how it processes events. I do not like the event structure being inside the idle case. This one particular app I wrote runs test sequences consisting of multiple states back to back (essentially a macro). If the user presses the ESC key, they can interrupt the test sequence and skip to the end. To implement this, I had to poll the IDLE case in every one of the states of the test sequence to see if this event had happened. I didn't like doing that so I removed it and I thought I would share how I did it. I like this method much better because it will process the events as they happen but can also, in a way, prioritize the events. So obviously, I had to pull out the event structure and place it in its own process loop. You'll notice the UI Event queue for passing states to the state machine. Next, I create a VI that reads from the queue, with a very small timeout, and adds the event state to the front of the JKI state queue. This VI goes in front of the Parse State Queue VI so that the event is added to the font of the state queue. And within the state machine, I added a UI: Process Event state that accepts two arguments: first is the control and the second is the value associated with the control action. This works for my application but may need to be changed for other needs. Within the state, I can now determine whether to process the event immediately (as in the case of the ESC button scenario that I mentioned above) or I can choose to add another state to the end of the queue to be processed after the current queue is empty. I think this method keeps the UI responsive and doesn't require the additional requests to the IDLE states scattered throughout your program. I would definitely suggest enabling and disabling controls to only allow events to happen that make sense at that point in time. This would prevent a flood of events being added to the front of the queue if the user decides to go on a clicking spree.
  44. 1 point
    Whoops, my bad. I don't really know VIPM very well. My co worker wrote: "I think you're looking at a re-packaged version of JKI VI Tester for MacOS that I made locally. VI Tester still shouldn't be available for mac through VIPM. "
  45. 1 point
    I installed VIPM (2014 because that's the latest build for Mac) on MacOS. It's showing plenty of packages such as ones from NI, MGI, etc... But oddly, no JKI packages. So I can't find VI tester in the list. Any idea what could be causing that?
  46. 1 point
    Thanks @Jim Kring for the quick response! Glad I wasn't crazy for thinking it could be done "in theory". My team is definitely in need of VIPM pro but in the near future we would need a way to automate applying vipc files during our build process. Using command line is actually great for our purposes.
  47. 1 point
    On my MacOS machine, VIPM can't find JKI VI Tester and all of the weblinks are vipm:// links and don't seem to work on MacOS. Is there a plan old download link for vi tester .vip file?
  48. 1 point
    It worked. Only issue is when opening the visual tester it looks for some stuff from registry.llb (or dll I can't remember) and I have to ignore it, but the tester ran fine after ignoring those files.
  49. 1 point
    I have a colleague that is interested in learning LabVIEW and I want to get him started on the JKI SM (and SMOs) right out of the gate. Are there any ready-made presentations that demonstrate the common pitfalls facing a new developer, and how the JKI SM handles them? Thank you, Jim
  50. 1 point
    In this example, we show how you can refactor existing code. We have taken the 3 button dialog that ships with the base version of LabVIEW and upgraded it to use the JKI State Machine template. We have not added or changed any functionality. Also, we have not changed the way the functionality is implemented. Here is a screenshot showing how the VI looked before the refactoring: Here is a screenshot showing how the VI looked after applying the JKI State Machine template: We've attached the the refactored VI that has been written in LabVIEW 8.2. Remember that you need to have the JKI State Machine package installed in your version of LabVIEW. Click here for information on how to install the JKI State Machine. Three_Button_Dialog_CORE___JKI.vi The original VI is located at: \Utility\error.llb\Three Button Dialog CORE.vi Click here to watch a video that describes some of the design thought process used in the re-factoring: Video: Refactoring the LabVIEW three button dialog
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